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Archive for the ‘Stage Photography’ Category

11 Tips for On Stage Photography

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On December - 22 - 2017
11 tips for On Stage Photography - Dramatic Stage Photography

11 tips for On Stage Photography - Dramatic Stage Photography

Of all the types of photography ever invented, I would claim that live concert photography is up there among the most difficult ones. You have five thousand fans behind you, and there is a band in front of you. Nobody stands still. In fact, even the notion of standing still ruins the idea of a good music photo. The bouncers hate you, because you are in their way. The crowd is jealous of you. Crowdsurfers will kick you in the head. The band thinks you’re annoying. The lighting is never bright enough, and changes so frequently that you’re screwed even in the few moments that it is. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tips: Photographing Orchestra Concerts

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On November - 16 - 2017

Photographing Orchestra Concerts

Photographing Orchestra Concerts



Concerts are different than other types of musical events due to several of its characteristics. In addition to generally displaying classical music, concerts have aspects that can become constrictive to photograph.
The most important thing when it comes to photographing concerts is that the camera can’t be too noisy and the photographer can’t move around while a score is being played. The audience are generally concentrating on the concert itself and aren’t very keen in taking pictures.

Therefore, high-powered cameras such as the Canon EOS 1D or the Nikon D3 should not be used. The sound the shutter makes is too prominent. Use cameras with low shutter noise. You should be able to judge for yourself which are appropriate.

The second most important thing is; you as the photographer can’t move around while photographing. So it’s better you arrive early and position yourself in the most advantageous spot. However, official appointed photographers are usually the only ones allowed to photograph during a concert. If you are an appointed official, plan your photo shoot carefully. But don’t forget: shoot as little as possible to avoid interfering with the concert proceedings. Addition photographs can be taken when the music is loud (and would overshadow the sound of your shutter being triggered).
As a general technical guide, use ISO setting of around 400 to 800, and try to use a lens with a wide opening such as an f2.8. Pack both a telephoto and wide lens, both are equally needed.

The following are general guidelines for photographing concerts: Read the rest of this entry »

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