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The Advantages of the Full Frame Sensor on a DSLR Camera

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On December - 10 - 2020

The Benefits of the Full Frame Sensor on a DSLR Camera

The Benefits of the Full Frame Sensor on a DSLR Camera



You who may be a newbie in the world of photography may be wondering: “Why do professional photographers, especially studio and fashion photographers, spend big bucks on expensive full-framed cameras?” Or maybe if there are full-framed DSLR users amongst the readers please feel free to comment below.

The following are some of the benefits of full frame FX sensors compared to DX (APS-C / APS-H) sensors:

– Drastically less Noise in high ISOs. Although ordinary DSLRs are capable of producing good photos at higher ISOs, this does mean that they are without noise. Take the Nikon DX classes for comparisons. The highest (Nikon D300) and lowest (Nikon D40) of that class uses the same sized sensors meaning noise level at high ISOs are the same. The case may be that the D300 uses a better noise reduction approach at high-level ISOs, making it seem cleaner than in the D40. But when compared to the D700, for example, the D300 clearly fails in comparison. The professionals do not compromise when it comes to noise. Read the rest of this entry »

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