What You Should Keep In Mind About DSLR Camera’s Memory Cards

Limitations of Digital Processing in Photography

Nikkor 105mm f/1.8Ais on EOS 1000D

How to Clean Your DSLR Sensor

The Digital Photography Book  by Scott Kelby

Tips for Improving Your Photography Skills

When Do We Need to Upgrade Our Photographic Equipments?

External Flash Photography Techniques

Tips on Photographing Children and Families with Graham Monro

Understanding DSLR Lens Sweet Spots and How to Get Them

The Orbs Phenomenon Based on The Theory of Photography

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On November - 13 - 2018ADD COMMENTS
Orbs Photography

Orbs Photography

There is a friend of mine who once told me a story “yesterday, I went to an old house which is said to be haunted. Did you know what happened when I was taking a picture in an empty room? There were some mysterious circular lights and I am quite sure that at the moment, there were nothing there. I was convinced that those were ghosts’ appearances. Did you think I would believe it? Huffs…of course not, Orbs phenomenon can be explained easily according to the theory of photography. Here’s the explanation.

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How to Safely Carry Your Camera

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On November - 12 - 20181 COMMENT
How to safely carry camera

How to safely carry camera

If you’re a DSLR camera user, there’s a simple and quick tip to protect your lens and camera, especially when you’re using a telephoto lens attached to your camera body. Do pay attention to the way you carry your camera on your shoulder.
Pay close attention to the two images below and note the difference between the two. On the image to the left, the ends of the lens is facing outward. Now note how the image to the right shows the person carrying the camera with the lens facing inwards towards the person. Read the rest of this entry »

Tamron and Tokina Lens Codes and What They Mean

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On November - 12 - 2018ADD COMMENTS

Tamron Lens Codes

Tamron Lens Codes



A short while ago, I’ve made a post explaining the meaning in different Sigma lens codes. Now, in this post, I’ll explain the meaning codes for Tamron and Tokina lenses. They are as follows:

Tamron Lenses

Di – Digitally Integrated. Lenses with this code has a coating optimized for digital cameras.

Di-II – This is similar to the Di. But these lenses can only be used with cameras with cropped sensors (APSC).

Di III – These lenses are specially designed for mirrorless cameras.

USD – Ultrasonic Silent, like the USM or SWM. These lenses has a fast and quiet autofocus. Read the rest of this entry »

Lomography Techniques

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On November - 11 - 20181 COMMENT

Lomography Techniques

Lomography Techniques


Photo by : Ciel Photography on Flickr

As what was done by the two pioneers of this field of photography, lomography has developed into a photographic technique that ignores the existing rules. When executing conventional photography techniques, a lot of rules must be adhered to (e.g. shutter speed, ISO, and aperture) to create a good photography. Meanwhile, those same rules tend to be ignored when photographing using Lomography techniques. Lomography emphasizes more on producing unique photographs, so the results are quite subjective. Read the rest of this entry »

The 365-day Project by Andrew Whyte: The Legographer

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On November - 11 - 2018ADD COMMENTS
Legographer-lego photography by Andrew Whyte

Legographer-lego photography by Andrew Whyte

An English photographer named Andrew Whyte has dedicated himself into documenting the adventure of a brave LEGO figurine on his quest around the whole of England in the photo series titled “The Legographer.”

Andrew Whyte is actually better known for his expertise in using darkness as the background for his photos. By several medias, he’s been dubbed a maestro of low light. Also, he’s used his long exposure photography technique to crate some amazing photographs. But now, he’s on a mission to tell a different tale. Armed with his Lego character and his iPhone 4s, he’s on a 365-day project called “The Legographer.” This means he’ll be documenting every day for a year! A momentous dedication to achieve great results.

The photography technique used is actually quite simple. Even we can easily do it. What’s more important here is the imagination and the perfect composition. Andrew Whyte choose his smartphone camera instead of a DSLR or any other because the camera phone is more versatile to be carried everywhere. How much of a hassle would be to carry around a clunky professional DSLR and lenses 3 times the size of the iPhone. This just proves that creativity isn’t subject to how much high-tech gear you use.

Here are some of Andrew Whyte in “The Legographer” series: Read the rest of this entry »