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Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On February - 8 - 2017

What and how to get a Prominent Point of Interest in Photography

What and how to get a Prominent Point of Interest in Photography



Point of Interest is the gravitating aspect that will draw the viewers to a certain point of the photograph. Ideally, there is one point of interest (POI) in a photograph to ensure its viewers are able to understand the message conveyed by the photograph. There are several techniques to ensure the photograph’s viewers comprehend the POI:

1. Fill the Frame
By filling the frame with the main object, the object will inevitably be the center of attention. There are several ways to fill the frame with the main object of the photograph. Some of these include:
– Photographing closer to the object.
– Using a telephoto lens or zoom.
– Cropping.

Point of Interest in Photography - Fill the frame

Point of Interest in Photography - Fill the frame

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