What is EXIF Data in Digital Photography?

The Easy Way to Shoot Children’s Expressions

A Beginner’s Guide To Landscape Photography

Fact about DSLR Shutter Count

Sound-Activated Camera Trigger for High Speed Photography

Magic Lantern 2.3 Provides Awesome Features for Canon DSLR Cameras

Tips to Keep the Lens Rear Cap and the Body Cap of Your Camera Safe

What is Vignette in The World of Photography?

Download Photography PDF: Canon EOS 60D User’s Guide

Why would shooting in JPEG be better than RAW

Photographer’s Etiquettes You should Know About

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On February - 23 - 2020

Photographer’s Etiquettes  - You Should Know About

Photographer’s Etiquettes - You Should Know About


As social beings and specifically as photographers, we are not spared from human interactions. If photography is your hobby, then we deal directly with your subjects. Even if your interests are more towards landscapes, you will inevitably interact with the people on location to gain information or any assistance.

That is why etiquette is an important issue. Though this topic is seldom discussed. Photographers are usually more interested in discussing cameras, lenses, lightings, and other photography technique related subject.

The meaning of etiquette, at least my version of it, is the interactions between people, between photographer and model, between photographers and assistants, and interactions with the locals. By having good ethical skills, the photographer is benefitted by getting more meaningful photographs, more pleasant to view, and natural. People around you will also be happier to give you any assistance.

Generally, having good etiquette means being humble, respectful towards others, enthusiastic, and kind. In photographing portraits, for instance, especially if the models are women, you can respect them by not touching them when directing poses. Touching the models can be considered rude, especially in Asia, and can make the model become uncomfortable. Also, avoid speaking in a commanding voice and praise or thank your models frequently when it is due. And if the models aren’t posing the way you want them to, do not place blame or say demeaning things because it will have a negative effect on the model’s mood. This will undoubtedly ruin the shoot. Read the rest of this entry »

.

Related Photography Ideas for photographers ethics at OneSlidePhotography.com

How Consistent is your Photography Work

A while back, I hosted a website about the world’s legendary photographers. These were Ansel Adams (of course), Sebastian Salgado, Yousouf Karsh, and many more. One by one I observed their galleries and then interpreted and blogged what I believed was the message the photographer tried to convey through their photography. I also noted and […]


Beginner’s Guide to Architectural Photography

Architectural photography at its best will convey the experience of being in and around a built environment. It is a broad subject, encompassing everything from skyscrapers to shacks. Virtually everywhere we go, we are surrounded by some sort of architecture on a daily basis. Because of this, it should come as no surprise that architecture […]


Basic Studio Portrait Lighting Techniques

Learn 3 different studio portrait lighting techniques using just one light.


5 More Famous Figures’ Last Photographs Before They Died

1. Lady Diana The above photo was the last photo ever before the crash happened. Many press/paparazi raced to print it as the last photo of the princess. As seen, only her golden hair is visible in this photograph. The photo was taken on the car ride from Hotel Ritz in Paris at around 12:20 […]


Facts Behind Kevin Carter’s Photograph: Vulture Stalking a Child

The story behind of an African child in Sudan who was starving in a Pulitzer Prize winning photograph is revealed. Till date, some rumors about Kevin carter piece above are still doing the rounds. A Pulitzer Prize winning photo in 1994 that shows a gaunt little child with a vulture as the background is always […]


Creating Unusual Bokeh With Your Fingers

Want a photograph with this unique bokeh? It’s easy and cheap to do, without any complicated editing in Photoshop, without any expensive filters, and without the need of a high-and camera. The only tools you need are a wide-aperture lense ( I used the Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 Ais) and your finger. Yep, your fingers 🙂


First Aid Procedures For Cameras Dropped on Surface or Submerged in Water

Some cameras have been manufactured to be impact, water, and dust resistant. But cameras of that caliber are not many and the prices are also expensive. It is advisable for owners of pocket camera/DSLR camera not classified as impact-resistant to treat their device with caution. But if impact occurs, there are a few suggestions users […]