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How to View the Shutter Count of a Nikon Camera

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On July - 12 - 2016

How to View the Shutter Count of a Nikon

How to View the Shutter Count of a Nikon



If you want to find out how often a camera is used to photograph, then what you can do is check the shutter count number of that camera. This is very useful when you want to buy a used camera.

Shutter Count (SC for short) is the total amount of times the camera’s shutter has been released to record a photograph. Why is SC so important? Because a shutter unit is the barrier between sensor and the mirror that’s used to reflect the image seen through the lens. The reflected image is then recorded in the sensor (CCD/CMOS) located behind the camera. For the mirror to rotate and then the image to be recorded, the shutter has to open and then close each time. Like any mechanical apparatus, the technical design of a camera has limits. There’s an expiration as to how many times the mechanism can function normally before the quality degrades and the apparatus loses function (or breaks down).

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