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Nikon D5100 Tips and Tricks

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On August - 8 - 2017

D5100 Tips and Tricks

D5100 Tips and Tricks


The Nikon D5100 is Nikon’s newest camera. It offers the same technical image quality of the unbeaten Nikon D7000 in a smaller, lighter, less expensive package.The D5100 has a very similar 16.2MP CMOS sensor to the excellent one seen in the D7000 but, understandably, loses out on that camera’s high-end build and feature-set. So there’s no wireless flash control, magnesium alloy build or 39-point AF system but the underlying image quality is all but identical. The Nikon D5100 can record Full HD movies at 1920×1280 pixels / 25fps with stereo sound. A high-resolution 3-inch vari-angle LCD monitor makes it easier to compose your shots from difficult angles, while the extensive ISO range of 100-25600 should cope with virtually all lighting conditions. A 4fps burst shooting mode, 11-point autofocus system with 3D Focus Tracking, High Dynamic Range mode, Active D-Lighting and seven different special effects for stills and movies complete the Nikon D5100’s headline specs. Read the rest of this entry »

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