Canon 5D Mark III vs Nikon D800, which is Better?

Auto-Focusing Tips for Your DSLRs

Wildlife Photography Tips and Tutorial with Chris McLennan

Limitations of Digital Processing in Photography

What You Should Keep In Mind About DSLR Camera’s Memory Cards

Tips in Photographing Faces with “Unflattering” Features

Wedding Roundography – Super Awesome Photographer Lucy Martin

Tips for Improving Your Photography Skills

The Importance of Horizon Line in Photography

Tutorial: Creating a Panorama Photo using Adobe Photoshop

6 Reasons Why You Have to Buy External Flash

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On September - 27 - 2017
Built-in flash vs External Flash

Built-in flash vs External Flash

Photography is originated from Greek language, “photos” which literally means light and “graphein” which means drawing. In other words, it means drawing with light. Lighting is the most important part of photography and there will be times when you will need additional light sources. For example, pop-up flash (or flash featured in every camera), it can only provide a very limited lighting. It does not give you more room for creativity. Then it will be the exact time where you will need external flash.

There are six reasons why you need to take the advantages of having additional flash with you to develop your ability in photography:

1. Flash lamp is able to face more directions
One of the issues of having the built-in flash only is the fact that it can only emit the light from the front part only. Another weakness of it is that this flash light can only shine on one part of the photo only (to the middle) which can make the object look too bright while the surrounding is too dark. Apart from that, this built-in flash has relatively low power.

With additional flash where the lamp can be rotated and tilted, you can get rid or fix the minuses of built-in flash. Because the flash lamp’s position can be adjusted (up, down, right, left, and etc.), you can reflect the light and spread it so it will not get too severe when it reaches the object. You can use any kind of surface surrounding you to reflect it like wall, ceiling, a reflector, and etc.

If it is for a certain reason, you got nothing to use as a surface to reflect the light (for example, the wall is too far or the ceiling is too high) you can fix this problem by setting the angle of the flash lamp in variety of tilt (45, 60, 75 degrees) so most of the light from the lamp will not fall onto the object. This will also help the object from fierce dazzle. Read the rest of this entry »

.

Related Photography Ideas for external flash vs built-in flash at OneSlidePhotography.com

Should you Upgrade Your Camera First or your Lens?

As a photographer progressing in your craft, there must come a time when you’re faced with a dilemma; which should be a priority, a camera or a lens upgrade? Neither has a specific standard which is more of a priority; what you need to find out is which of the two do you really need […]


6 Digital Camera’s Arch Enemies

Many assumes that the shutter count of a camera determines the age of the camera. There’s some truth in that, but it’s not all there is to it. Sure, the more frequently a camera is used, the greater the chance of damage but the figures on the shutter count can’t be used as a reference […]


Image Stabilizer, Is It Required or Not?

One thing which we recently meet in a new generation digital camera is the image stabilizer feature. This one particular feature is becoming a trend which should be there in every new age camera. However, still there are so many cameras which remain untouched by this very feature. How important is this image stabilizer in […]


What’s the Safest Way of Storing Digital Photograph Files?

Digital photography have made it easier for photographers to do their craft. A simple “click” of the shutter button and your photos will instantly appear on the LCD of the camera. Simple, but it brings upon a new dilemma. How do you go about storing these digital files for prolonged safekeeping? The following may answer […]


The Principles of Shooting Video With a DSLR

In this episode, Mark Wallace from Adorama TV will go over the principles of shooting video with a DSLR.


First Aid Procedures For Cameras Dropped on Surface or Submerged in Water

Some cameras have been manufactured to be impact, water, and dust resistant. But cameras of that caliber are not many and the prices are also expensive. It is advisable for owners of pocket camera/DSLR camera not classified as impact-resistant to treat their device with caution. But if impact occurs, there are a few suggestions users […]


Nikkor 105mm f/1.8Ais on DSLR

Nikkor 105mm f/1.8, manual lens with 9 aperture blades … and the closest focusing distance is 42 in… with a smooth and wonderful bokeh Nikon mounted to the DSLR body (EOS 1000d)? yup … why not using a lens adapter of course ..