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CCD vs CMOS-DSLR Camera, Wich One is Better?

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On July - 5 - 2019
CCD vs CMOS-DSLR Camera, Which One is Better - Camera Sensor

CCD vs CMOS-DSLR Camera, Which One is Better - Camera Sensor

An image sensor is a device that converts an optical image to an electric signal. It is used mostly in digital cameras and other imaging devices. Early sensors were video camera tubes but a modern one is typically a charge-coupled device (CCD) or a complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor. Today, most digital still cameras use either a CCD image sensor or a CMOS sensor. Both types of sensor accomplish the same task of capturing light and converting it into electrical signals. CCD vs CMOS. That is the question. Whether ’tis nobler to choose quality and cost or to choose features and energy efficiency. Should it be CCD (charge coupled device) or CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor)when making your digital camera choice? Read the rest of this entry »

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