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Practical Tips on Architectural Photography

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On February - 8 - 2017
Architectural Photography

Architectural Photography

Architectural photography can be easy yet difficult. It is easy because the objects are not moving. And it is difficult because of the lighting on the object can be very dependent on the weather which is very unpredictable. Apart from that, the challenge lies on how we find good position and right angle so that the building looks more interesting and majestic. There are some tips and tricks on architectural photography from how to get good lighting, lens choices until how to get good angle while shooting:

1. Wake up early
To shoot architecture objects, you need more than a day, because it will be hugely dependent on the weather. Good architectural photo will be obtained when the sunlight drops exactly on the building with the support of clear blue sky in the morning or afternoon. It gets fierce during the day and when it gets windy. Apart from that, the perfect time to shoot is the “blue hour” where the sky looks blue before it gets dark (evening).

2. Use wide lens
It is very hugely needed in order to capture the building as a whole. When we use standard lens/kit, we cannot get the image of the whole building (it gets cut). The recommended wide lens ranges from 12 to 18 mm. if you use a camera with fixed lens which is not so wide or if you use Smartphone, you can apply the panorama feature. If you do not have it, you can go forward or backward so that the image of the whole building can be taken. Read the rest of this entry »

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