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Fact about DSLR Shutter Count

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On May - 1 - 20186 COMMENTS
Fact about DSLR Shutter Count - Nikon Shutter Unit

Fact about DSLR Shutter Count - Nikon Shutter Unit

Questions concerning Shutter Counts often arise in forum conversations or discussions among beginner photographers. DSLRs, which eliminate the need for film rolls, are often deemed limitless in its usage. Photograph at will, examine results, and if not satisfactory, a simple push of the delete.
Without even a thought, the user may have photographed thousands of times in mere moments. This may be okay if the user is still at the initial learning stage, but should not be done continuously. This is because the DSLR has a shutter count limit that will have an impact on the expiration of the DSLR unit.
As stated in the title, the DSLR camera’s shutter is still the same as that on analog SLR cameras. Though controlled electronically, the DSLR’s still has a mechanical shutter that opens and closes with each photograph taken.

This shutter movement is what causes the distinctive shutter sound a DSLR camera emits when photographing. Many do not know that if used continuously, it will sooner or later reach its expiration date of usability (jammed or malfunctions). Users commonly get trigger-happy when they first purchase a DSLR camera and are then surprised when they discover that their shutter count has a limit. They may then regret the useless photographs they’ve squandered in the past. Read the rest of this entry »

Understanding Shooting Modes of DSLRs

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On April - 30 - 20182 COMMENTS
Understanding Shooting Modes of DSLRs - Nikon Modes

Understanding Shooting Modes of DSLRs - Nikon Modes

There are 11 modes of shooting on a Nikon Entry Level camera (D70s, D80, D90..etc). They are:

M = Fully Manual Mode
In this mode, the settings of the camera are fully manual (shutter speeds, aperture, ISO, etc). Most suitable for indoor studio photography, this setting can also be used outdoors. However, due to frequently changing lighting conditions, this mode may cause missed exposures if not properly used.

A = Aperture Priority
In this mode, aperture can be set accordingly and the shutter speed will automatically sync for the proper exposure. This mode is most suitable for photographing with narrow DOF (Depth of Field), where the lens is set at its widest aperture.

S = Shutter Priority
In this mode, the shutter speed can be adjusted according, and in turn the aperture will sync for the proper exposure. This mode is most suitable for photography methods such as panning. For further details about panning, consult THIS article. Read the rest of this entry »

12 Tips for Candid Photography

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On April - 30 - 20182 COMMENTS

12 Tips for Candid Photography

12 Tips for Candid Photography



There is a term in photography, candid shots, where the subject of the photograph is not in a controlled position or unaware of the camera (photo coverage). The resulting picture looks more natural, spontaneous, and less contrived. The following are tips for successful candid photography:

1. Bring your camera everywhere. Be ready to shoot at any time because an interesting moment may be just around the corner.

2. Pay close attention to your surroundings. The simplest things may become interesting objects to shoot. These may be a daydreaming store owner, people waiting for their train, the elderly, someone sitting next to you, a couple of lovebirds. The possibilities are endless. Read the rest of this entry »

Easy ways to use manual lenses on DSLRs

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On April - 29 - 2018ADD COMMENTS

An easy way to use manual lenses on DSLRs

An easy way to use manual lenses on DSLRs


Since the digital age introduced itself to cameras, photography has become more intriguing and definitely more enjoy, for both hobbyists/enthusiasts and professionals. With the increasing number of people pursuing this hobby, one of the most joyous effects is that cameras have become progressively cheaper. But these cheap price tags of camera did not include the decreasing price of camera lenses. On the contrary, it has since become relatively more expensive. One solution to cut your spending on lenses is to use older-issued manual focused lenses on your DSLR body. You may wonder if this is at all possible, and the answer is a definite “yes.” Using a rather cheap lens adapter, you can mount your lenses onto your DSLRs. Better yet, for those using Nikon DSLR models, these older manual focused lenses has the same exact mount, so no adapters necessary.

Easy ways to use manual lenses on DSLRs: Read the rest of this entry »

Tips to Shoot During Soccer Match

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On April - 29 - 2018ADD COMMENTS

Soccer Match Photo Tips

Soccer Match Photo Tips


Shooting a soccer match is almost similar to shooting any other sport branches. There are many times photographers have no clue about what they have taken since things happen so fast to be seen by their normal eyes. Going by this reality, there is an urge of need to have the ability to frame “forecasted scenes that will happen”. In other words, sometimes a photographer must aim the lens at a certain direction with a prediction that there is something going to happen which is photographically interesting.

There will be so many predictions. One of them is when a corner kick takes place. In a soccer match, there must always be corner kick, right? If you love to watch soccer match, you must know well the order of happenings in a corner kick performance. The ball is kicked from a corner of the field, then bounces and will fall around the front of the goalpost. The next event is when the keeper tries hard to catch or skim the ball. There will be a player who also tries to drive away the ball or the opposing player who attempts a goal.

From the order of events, a photographer will know how to get good images on such complicated scene in front of the goalpost and aims the lens in one point where the ball falls after being kicked from a corner. Using focus and focal length lens which has to be precise, a photographer can press the shutter and gets mostly interesting scenes when the ball falls. Read the rest of this entry »