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Dos and Don’ts of Digital Photography

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On May - 15 - 2016

Dos and Don'ts of Digital Photography - photographer fail

Dos and Don'ts of Digital Photography - photographer fail


Now days digital photography does not include chemical processing to develop pictures while computer and digital technology and it is being used in developing pictures. People now have adopted this technology even in professional photo shoots. People always think good about the photographers because they provide them with best results but other than their services, there are some bad habits of digital photographer that have been seen which should be known by other people who have interests in photography and going to adopt this activity as profession.

1. NOT DOUBLE CHECKING YOUR GEAR BAG
It never happened to you? It sure did to me! I can’t remember how many times I went shooting just to notice later on that I forgot the CF cards at home. Just a few months ago my wife and I took a photography trip to Croatia and I totally forgot to pack the battery charger with me! So if you are as clumsy as I am, maybe you should trust your wife in packing things up for you.


2. NOT DOUBLE CHECKING ISO SETTINGS
This is surely one of the most common post subjects you will find if you linger long enough in Digital Photography forums. We are all somehow used to reaching for our ISO settings button just when we need to go “higher” and we too often take it for granted that the camera is set to the “correct” one every time we take it from the bag. And that is why so many people are asking for the ISO setting to be displayed in the viewfinder, until then and to avoid surprises, good or bad, make sure to double check that ISO setting every time you turn your camera on.


3. I SHOOT RAW, I DON’T CARE ABOUT EXPOSURE
RAW is wonderful tool and gives us, photographers, a great deal of flexibility during post processing. The ability to tweak the exposure in RAW should be used ONLY within limits — blown highlights and and underexposed shadows can’t be recovered. So make sure to always get the exposure right.


4. DELETING PICTURES TOO FAST
Well I’m writing this specially for myself! I delete pictures faster than I take them sometimes… Here is a recent article from Oneslidephotography.com explaining why we should never be doing this.


5. BETTER BODY INSTEAD OF BETTER LENS
I guess it is just a human nature but every time a new camera is released we have all tendency to become green with envy and deep down we should know that we would be much better investing in a better lens than in a better camera.


6. BLAMING THE MATERIAL
And, of course, on the TOP of the list “Blaming the material”! When we do not manage of getting a decent picture we go like “AH if only I had that lens!” but if someone looks at a nice pictures of ours and says “Wow you should have a nice camera!!!” We go crazy… Anyway, remember folks, it is always the photographer never the Camera.


7. DON’T EDIT THE ORIGINAL!
Simple edits, like cropping, red-eye removal, etc. can make a mediocre photo look great. But use caution when making these types of edits. Each time you save a compressed file, like the JPEG format used in most digital photos, it recompresses the file, thus reducing its quality further. This is true whether you actually make an edit or not, so be sure not to touch the original.


8. DON’T EMAIL PHOTOS!
Share them online instead. It’s easier and it doesnt clog up your recipient’s mail account. Use any one of the free sharing web sites like Flickr, Shutterfly or EasyShare to host the photos or albums you want to share. Most allow you to invite only those who you want to see them, and many allow your guests to save your images and order prints of the ones they like. Social networking sites, like Facebook, and photo blogs sites offer other creative ways to share your images.


Follow these tips and you’ll be on your way to a better digital photography experience!
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