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Meaning of Codes on Sigma Lenses

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Archive for the ‘Lens’ Category

Meaning of Codes on Sigma Lenses

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On December - 13 - 2018

Sigma Lens Codes

Sigma Lens Codes



Each lens are made in accordance with the features and functions that it has. And the following are codes on Sigma lenses and the meaning to each one.

EX – EX Lenses are premium lenses in the Sigma lens product line, like the L Series of Canon lenses. It’s no surprise that EX coded lenses are usually relatively expensive.

DC – DC Lenses are lenses designed specifically for cameras with a (APSC). If your camera is a camera with a full-frame sensor, this lens is not for you.

DG – DG lenses are Sigma lenses designed for both the full-frame and cropped sensors.

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Understanding the Codes on Canon Lens

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On December - 5 - 2018
Canon Lens Code

Canon Lens Code

As a rookie photographer who just learn about photography those codes written on the lens of your camera can be very confusing. There are some explanations on those written codes on canon lens here.

EF-S
EF here stands for “Electro focus”, while the S stands for “Small Image Circle”. It is called so because this lens has its own motor electronic to find focus automatically while the small image circle is there because the image which is transferred to the sensor is smaller than the image size on the EF lens. EF-S lens is specially designed for a non full-frame canon camera (the sensor size is smaller) and cannot be used for full frame camera. Apart from that, EF-S lens is usually used for low-end class lenses.

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DOF Preview Button: What it is and How to Use it

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On December - 3 - 2018

DOF preview button - 5D mk II

DOF preview button – 5D mk II



When mounting a lens to a DSLR camera body, then peer into the viewfinder, what you’ll see is the image in the lens’ widest aperture settings. Now what if you want to see the image when using the smallest aperture opening straight from the viewfinder in order to get an accurate image of how the results will turn out? Read the rest of this entry »

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White Box and Standard Box Canon Lens, What is the Difference?

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On November - 29 - 2018
Standard and White Box lens

Standard and White Box lens

If you want to buy a lens for Canon DSLR, maybe you would be flustered to choose which version from two that you should buy. The first version is lens in standard box which printed an information about the lens on it. The second version is lens in white box, just plain white box without any printed character. So what’s the different between these two versions? Read the rest of this entry »

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How to Get the Star Effect in Photography

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On November - 23 - 2018

Star Effect Photography

Star Effect Photography



Generally, when people choose a lens, they seldom consider the amount of blades in the lens’ aperture. But in fact, the amount of blades is very very important if your photography interests include photographing elements of light or the sun and love achieving that star effect.

The difference in aperture settings doesn’t only affect the Depth of Field (DOF) alone. In both of the photos below I used the Aperture Priority settings with 200 ISO.

By using a narrow aperture (f/10), the photograph requires more time to absorb light. This results in star-shaped light images in stationary light sources and the light tracks of the rotating Ferris wheel appear long (long exposure).

The use of a wide aperture setting (f/3.5) allows short exposure time, which produces spherical glow in the stationary light sources and short light tracks on the rotating Ferris wheel (freezing).

To achieve a crisp star-effect on your stationary light source when in low lighting conditions (like at night, for example), you’ll most likely need a tripod because the star effect relies on the narrow aperture settings. This means slower shutter speeds in low light conditions, which means a tripod is needed to keep the camera steady for longer periods of time.

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