Causes and Solutions for Vignettes on Photos

Which is Best? Mirrorless Cameras vs. DSLR Cameras

Tips and Ethics to Abide By when Photographing Weddings

Jennifer, The First “Topless” Woman to Get Edited in Photoshop

Download PDF – Canon DSLR Lens Catalogue

Download Photography PDF: Outdor Photography Articles

Tips on photographing motorcycle or car races

Creating Dark Blue Sky Using Polarizer Filter

Tips: Preserving Battery Life of your Digital Camera

Download : Canon EOS 1100D User’s Guide

Archive for the ‘Beginner’s Guide to Photography’ Category

Tips on Shooting at the Blue Hour

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On April - 7 - 2018
Blue Hour Photography

Blue Hour Photography

Immortalizing flickering lights at the dark night is one of the photography branches which are lot of fun. The notion for it is called “night shoot”. Those gleaming and sparkling lamps are captured by the camera and appear like colorful stars that warm and cheer the dark night. And it just simply becomes so beautiful.

However, there is a moment where those shining lights can look even more beautiful compared to the night time. The time when the sunlight is already disappeared but the sky is not completely dark. At that very moment, we can look up at the sky and find some dark blue hues on it. That is the exact moment which we call “blue hour” in the world of photography. Read the rest of this entry »

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How to Get the Star Effect in Photography

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On April - 7 - 2018

Star Effect Photography

Star Effect Photography



Generally, when people choose a lens, they seldom consider the amount of blades in the lens’ aperture. But in fact, the amount of blades is very very important if your photography interests include photographing elements of light or the sun and love achieving that star effect.

The difference in aperture settings doesn’t only affect the Depth of Field (DOF) alone. In both of the photos below I used the Aperture Priority settings with 200 ISO.

By using a narrow aperture (f/10), the photograph requires more time to absorb light. This results in star-shaped light images in stationary light sources and the light tracks of the rotating Ferris wheel appear long (long exposure).

The use of a wide aperture setting (f/3.5) allows short exposure time, which produces spherical glow in the stationary light sources and short light tracks on the rotating Ferris wheel (freezing).

To achieve a crisp star-effect on your stationary light source when in low lighting conditions (like at night, for example), you’ll most likely need a tripod because the star effect relies on the narrow aperture settings. This means slower shutter speeds in low light conditions, which means a tripod is needed to keep the camera steady for longer periods of time.

Read the rest of this entry »

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5 Habits that Improve Your Skills In Photography

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On April - 6 - 2018
5 Habits that Improve Your Photography Skills

5 Habits that Improve Your Photography Skills

Indeed, digital camera gives photographers a number of benefits. The LCD screen on it allows us to see the resulted photo right after the shutter button is pressed and if the result is not satisfactory you can simply delete it and take another shot.
Apart from that, the auto exposure feature also makes things even easier for us. Even people who are just beginners in using DSLR camera can actually capture images with good and exact exposure by setting the camera to auto exposure mode. Moreover, there are more features that indulge every photographer like the auto white balance, auto focus, auto exposure bracketing and etc.

However, there are side effects to these easy facilities offered in digital cameras which are quite negative. Photographers become reluctant to learn some basic techniques of photography since all have been set automatically. In order to solve such problem, there are some good habits for photographers which can help us sharpening our instincts on photography: Read the rest of this entry »

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The Easy Way to Shoot Children’s Expressions

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On April - 5 - 2018
Spontaneous expression

Spontaneous expression

Shooting children can be a challenge somehow. They tend to get very difficult to manage and control and they usually feel scared and ashamed when they meet new people or strangers like photographer. The key success of taking good shots of children is to let them act spontaneously.

When we instruct them to act out certain poses, they tend to lose spontaneity and confidence. Let them act and express themselves spontaneously in front of camera. The easiest way is by asking them to play peek-a-boo, and if they are too old for this game, try to get them into conversation. Ask their names, their fathers’ and mothers’ names, their hobbies and etc, and let things flow naturally then take snap shots.

There are some tips and tricks on shooting children’s expressions spontaneously and naturally presented as follows: Read the rest of this entry »

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Red Eye in Photographs and How to Deal with Them

Posted by oneslidephotogaraphy On April - 3 - 2018

Red eye in photography

Red eye in photography



There are most likely times you encounter red eyes on your models in your results when you photograph. This, in the world of photography, is known as the “red eye effect.” This is a common phenomenon that occurs because the light from the flash reaches the blood vessels behind the retina of the eye and would then be bounced off and captured by the camera lens. Simply put, it’s related to how the light from the camera flash bounces off the eyes.

The amount of light that reaches the retina is controlled by the pupil. When light received is bright, the pupil will dilate smaller so no excessive light will come through. On the other hand, if the pupil receive dim lighting, the pupil will widen to allow as much light into the retina. Between the retina and the sclera (the whites of the eye) is a layer of tissues called choroid that’s red in color. Read the rest of this entry »

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Related Photography Ideas for Beginner’s Guide to Photography at OneSlidePhotography.com

Why did Einstein Stick Out his Tongue in his Portrait?

Why do you think Einstein stuck out his tongue in his most famous portrait? Many have asked that question, and there are even those that think it’s a photoshopped image. Turns out, this really was an authentic photograph and not the least bit photoshopped. So what’s the back story of this portrait?


7 Tips for Reflection Photography

Using reflections in photography can lead to some amazing effects and beautiful images. Using water, windows, mirrors or any sort of reflective surface can change an image into a work of art. Reflection photography is an art because you have to dig deep into your imagination to see the hidden beauty. It is also a […]


Tips to Learning Self-Taught Photography

Photography cameras, point-and-shoot and DSLRs alike, are now quite common in everyone’s inventory. More affordable technologies and ways of showcasing the results are now plenty and more varied. It’s no wonder that now photography has become a hobby for many people. But the desire to learn the crafts of photography properly does not increase with […]


Photography ideas: Out-Of-Focus Photography

Many beginner photographers think that a good photo can only be obtained by using a sharp lens that produces sharpness right to the edge of the frame. There’s truth in that, but it’s not always so. A sharp image without a sharp message doesn’t amount to much of a photograph. What would make a better […]


Rule of Third

The “Rule of Thirds” one of the first things that budding digital photographers learn about in classes on photography and rightly so as it is the basis for well balanced and interesting shots. The rule of thirds is a compositional rule of thumb in visual arts such as painting, photography and design. The rule states […]


Professional Cameras and Amateur cameras, what’s the difference?

Recently, someone commented on the photography blog about how a friend chose a used Canon 1D Mark IIn (2005) over a Canon 7D (2009). Their friend’s reason behind this decision is quite simple; because the Canon 1D Mark IIn is classified as a professional camera. So, what really differentiate a pro camera from a non-pro? […]


What Is Minimum Focus Distance (MFD) On a Camera Lens?

All types of lens available in the market feature a point where if we move closer to the object of the photo, the lens cannot focus (blurred). Commonly, this point is called Minimum Focusing Distance (MFD). It is indicated in length (for example 0, 5 m) measured from the distance of sensor in camera to […]